Comic Timing

The Bandleader blamed the Comic, for adding extra material.  The Comic blamed the Bandleader for coming in too early, drowning out the punchline.

Less than an hour after the end of the show, the Comic stood in a darkened doorway.  He’d arrived early, and removed the light-bulb.

As the musician fumbled with his keys, a voice tickled his ear:

“Laugh this off.”

Puzzled he turned, only to see a figure turning the corner at the end of the street.  His back began to itch as if it were on fire.

He turned and, in extreme discomfort, ran to the shower.

© David Jesson, 2018

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A little bit of Flash Fiction, which I submitted to one of Janet Reid’s competitions a few years ago now, but which has kept on getting bumped from FCBF for one reason or another.

There are a number of rules, but the key ones are:

1. Write a story using 100 words or fewer.

2. Use these words in the story:

extra
hour
early
light
dark

To compete for the Steve Forti Deft Use of Prompt Words prize (or if you are Steve Forti) you must also use: Fortran

3. You must use the whole word, but that whole word can be part of a larger word. The letters for the prompt must appear in consecutive order. They cannot be backwards.

Thus: early/pearly is ok, but light/sleight is not. Hours is fine, but grouch is not

(You might have to look twice, but I did manage to get Fortran in there :0) ).

Job Hunting

How could it be Fall again? Summer had seen my bank balance plummet, to the point that I was starting to tip into the red – a double whammy of too much fun and too few clients. I looked at the dog-eared copies of my favourite ‘tec novels slanted against each other on the shelf. What would Philip Marlow do? Sam Spade? Nick Charles? They’d shake things. They’d damn well find a client. I found a pencil and paper and started to write a list.

© David Jesson, 2018

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A little bit of Flash Fiction, which I submitted to one of Janet Reid’s competitions.  There are a number of rules, but the key ones are:

1. Write a story using 100 words or fewer.

2. Use these words in the story:

fall
plummet
tip
slant
list
3. You must use the whole word, but that whole word can be part of a larger word. The letters for the
prompt must appear in consecutive order. They cannot be backwards.
Thus: fall/fallacious is ok but fall/faille is not

 

Smile

You’ll see her, perhaps, if you take the time to look.  She’s there, in the crowd, or perhaps at the edge.  She’s there, in the park, in the cafe, on the bus, at the school gates.  She has a beautiful smile.  She talks to those around her: she engages.  But if you do spot her, if you notice her, you’ll see that whilst she talks, nobody ever really gets close.  Nobody ever gets close.  If they did, they might see that the beautiful smile never reaches the eyes.  Make sure she never notices you noticing, because nobody ever survives that.

 


© David Jesson, 2018

The End of the World

The atmosphere had been tense for days and the Threat Level had fluctuated between ‘Moderate’ and ‘Substantial’.  Warning signs were clear: skirmishes more frequent, escalating in intensity. It was only a matter of time before disaster struck.  That morning it was clear: the situation was deteriorating.  By lunchtime the Threat Level was at ‘Severe’, and during the afternoon it rose to ‘Critical’.  The world ended at teatime:

“But I wanted the green plate!”

The child wailed, limbs thrashing on the floor.

Later, the child soothed and sleeping peacefully, a toast was drunk to surviving the end of the world – again.

 

©David Jesson, 2018